Water type and suitability of Oklahoma surface waters for public supply and irrigation
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Water type and suitability of Oklahoma surface waters for public supply and irrigation by J. D. Stoner

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Published by U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division in Oklahoma City, Okla .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Water quality -- Oklahoma.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Statementby Jerry D. Stoner ; prepared in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.
SeriesWater-resources investigations -- 81-33, 81-39, 81-80, 82-29.
ContributionsGeological Survey (U.S.). Water Resources Division., Oklahoma Water Resources Board.
The Physical Object
Paginationv. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17829651M

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Get this from a library! Water type and suitability of Oklahoma surface waters for public supply and irrigation. [J D Stoner; Geological Survey (U.S.). Water Resources Division.; Oklahoma Water Resources Board.]. Water type and suitability of Oklahoma surface waters for public supply and irrigation. By J. D. Stoner, Geological Survey (U.S.). Water Resources Division. and Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Oklahoma Water Quality Standards Oklahoma’s Water Quality Standards Appendix C. Suitability of Water for Livestock and Irrigation Uses [REVOKED] Appendix A.7 Designated Beneficial Uses of Surface Waters Water Quality Management Basin 7, Panhandle Region SUBCHAPTER 1. GENERAL PROVISIONSFile Size: 1MB. The intent of this page is to provide online access to data and maps published by the OWRB and other water related agencies. Please note that many of these datasets are copies of production datasets and may not reflect current conditions. Each dataset has metadata documentation listing the publication date and describing the intended use and.

Oklahoma water law covers three classes ofOklahoma water law covers three classes of –– State Public Water Supply State Public Water Supply = , ac= , ac--ftft Withdrawals Stock Watering Water Supply 8% Irrigation 9% •During a peak irrigation day (assuming 1, wells pumping at 1 gallons per minute) Texas 38% 40%File Size: 1MB. A study was conducted to determine the suitability of surface water used for irrigation in and around the Polder area of Bhola Sadar Thana under Bhola District, Bangladesh, during April title: Public Water Supply Systems in Oklahoma: description: The original intent of this map was to provide a general overview of public water supply systems and their facilities studied as part of the Update of the Oklahoma Comprehensive Water Plan ().Additional systems have been added as the data has become available. As the state's designated water management agency, the OWRB appropriates stream water and groundwater. Permits must be obtained from the OWRB for all uses of water in Oklahoma with the exception of domestic use. Water is allocated in acre-feet, the amount that would cover one acre of land with water one foot deep or , gallons.

Get this from a library! Water type and suitability of Oklahoma surface waters for public supply and irrigation. Part 5: Washita River Basin through [J D Stoner; Oklahoma Water Resources Board.; Geological Survey (U.S.). Water Resources Division.]. Water type and suitability of Oklahoma surface waters for public supply and irrigation: Part 3: Canadian, North Canadian, and Deep Fork River basins through / By . Water use refers to water that is used for specific purposes. Water-use data is collected by area type (State, county, watershed or aquifer) and source such as rivers or groundwater, and category such as public supply or irrigation. Water-use data has been reported every five years since , for years ending in "0" and "5". The use of water-saving irrigation techniques has been encouraged in rice fields in response to irrigation water scarcity. Straw return is an important means of straw reuse. However, the environmental impact of this technology, e.g., nitrogen leaching loss, must be further explored.